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they already agreed to that. i think you heard john boehner say that already. we've had votes in the senate where we've actually gotten rid of tax credits. i think that's a given. and i think the vast majority of americans agree with that. the question is how do you do that and how do you allow taxes to rise at the same time you fix the real problem? and the real problem is uncontrolled entitlement spending and a government that has grown massively. not just under this administration, under republican administration. >> let me turn to senator schumer on this point. >> so you have to approach both sides of it. >> let me turn to senator schumer. i'm going to ask you the same question. if the mandate is compromised, what do democrats have to be prepared to accept as a painful outcome in order to achieve compromise? >> well, i agree with you, the mandate is compromise. that's why we have a divided house and senate. and i think if the house stands for anything it's cut government spending, as tom coburn said, and i think we're going to have to do more of it. we heard the mandate in 2010, where i
boehner is even interested in? >> i think it is probably something that he might consider. this is how negotiations work. congressional "fight club." they stake out their positions and sort of move closer together as they come together and actually meet and discuss this. there are couple options what they can do on the table. president signaled perhaps it doesn't have to be all about getting rates to clinton era levels. perhaps getting revenue from other places. i think that would be healthier, broader tax reform kind of deal made. i'm not sure whether they're all savvy enough to make that deal. i mean. martha: seems to me that is the major issue here. that is what john boehner was hinting at. he is suggesting that if you remove some of the loopholes that is a tax increase on the wealthy in this country. i feel like that is a message that has gotten across in perhaps a clear enough way. if you do same thing for u.s. corporations and roof move tax loopholes and don't end up in a situation where ge doesn't pay anything and small business pays through the nose. why isn't that kind of refo
by significant spending cuts? >> that was speaker of the house, john boehner after congressional leaders met with the president, earlier today to try to negotiate a way to avert the so-called fiscal cliff. both sides of the aisle came out confident that a deal would be made before the january 1 deadline. but neither side provided specifics on how that is going to happen. after boehner's vague comments, there are new concerns that the speaker may give up way too much and agree to tax increases. i'm here to lay out exactly what he has on the table. congressman, good to see you. >> good to be with you, sean. >> sean: i am concerned because -- >> i am -- you and me both? >> i am concerned about caving. you have outgoing virginia governor mcdonald, and former governor haley barbour and others saying, maybe we can give in on these things. did any house republican get elected and say to their constit webts they would raise taxes? if they did, i didn't hear it. >> i don't know a single one. sean, this is not the time to be defensive. and of course, there are plenty of people who say i am very offens
.6 trillion of new revenue. boehner had agreed to $800 billion. it's not hard to find $1.2 trillion as a kind of middle ground to that. then you want to have $4 trillion of total deficit reduction, so that leaves $2.8 trillion of spending reductions that have to happen. here's what people miss. we can avoid going over the cliff with the stroke of a pen. they can just extend all this stuff and kick the can down the road. the real question is are we going to have a big deal? are we going to agree on the major spending restraints that we need as well as the tax stuff in order to actually get the deficit under control? and i think the betting on that is less than 50%. i think we have a great shot at it. but it's going to be really, really hard. >> is that the view from wall street, too? they're not totally confident that this is going to happen? >> what you see in the stock market at the moment is that wall street is not totally confident. that's for sure. >> all right. steve, thanks so much. >> pleasure. >>> coming up, independent senator-elect of maine, angus king joins the conversation. he's a
to give? john boehner was asked an said he's willing to give a little on loopholes. but not a single question. he says he takes a balanced approach and that's what the people in the room think. he's balanced. same thing on benghazi. we have all these questions on benghazi and they are not answering. you have to go to denver to get a local radio host? megyn: there were two questions about benghazi. one was from ed henry. but they only had eight questions. i knew that sitting in this anchor chair. they my that. they are the white house press corps. you are telling me these are all issues that matter to some americans. climate change, immigration and so on. but when you only have eight questions and there isn't a question about how we are going to gets the debt under control or what we are going to do about the 23 million americans. >> i agree about whether he was going to meet with mitt romney was a waste of a question. megyn: if you had 20, go for it. >> i think we all agree on all sides that that was definitely a waste of a question. i want to push back on this softballing president
was willing to sign on the dotted line to that compromise with john boehner and eric cantor a year ago. we remain ready, willing and able to compromise. the american people have an unquenchable thirst for solutions. they have an unquenchable thirst for compromise and consensus. at that press conference yesterday it was nancy pelosi notwithstanding what governor christie has said. it was nancy pelosi who said we remain ready, willing and able to find a compromise. to find common ground with republicans to avoid the fiscal cliff. we need solutions and not sequestration. >> jonathan karl did an interview with paul ryan and what paul ryan said in this is essentially that, that the president doesn't have a mandate. karl said he won some 300 some electoral votes, every battleground state except for north carolina. does president obama have a mandate and, and he said no, i don't think so. because then nancy pelosi would be in charge of the house of representatives. and she's not. do you think that he's got a point? >> you know what has a mandate? solutions have a han date. this election was about
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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